How Coconut Oil Increases Energy Levels


by Nadia Bashir November 23, 2016

You’ve heard about the benefits of coconut water for years. But did you know that there’s another form of coconut that’s good for you? It’s coconut oil. And no, it’s not good just for your taste buds. Instead, coconut oil boosts and stabilizes energy levels. In fact, science shows that coconut oil energy benefits are hard to beat.

What’s the deal with coconut oil?

Coconut oil increases energy levels because it’s loaded with saturated fat. Most people avoid saturated fat like the plague because they think it’ll give them a heart attack. But recent research shows that scientists haven’t found much evidence linking fat to heart disease. Plus, the type of fat in coconut oil is different from the type of fat in steak and cheese.

Where do coconut oil energy benefits come from?

Unlike the long chains of fat in steak and cheese, most of the fat in coconut oil is medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs). The way your body uses MCTs is different from how it uses carbs and other fats.

When you eat carbs, your energy levels spike and drop rapidly. That’s why you feel exhausted in the afternoon and need to eat constantly to feel energized.

What makes MCTs special is that your body can process them easily and gradually over a few hours. This allows coconut oil to produce an immediate energy boost that’s more stable throughout the day.

Coconut oil is the best source of MCTs

If you’re looking for a potent dose of MCTs, coconut oil is the source. It’s got one of the highest natural concentrations of MCTs. That’s why coconut oil energy benefits are hard for even other superfoods to beat.

Want to stop midday crashes in their tracks? Buy coconut oil supplements on our website.




Nadia Bashir
Nadia Bashir

Author

Nadia is the Founder of Inpression Editing. She holds a PhD from the University of Toronto and has expertise in research, health care, and psychology. She has been interviewed by well-known organizations, including the David Suzuki Foundation and the National Post. She makes a mean gluten-free cinnamon—pecan bread and loves a good mint lemonade.



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